More Than 19 Million Millennials Across The US “Mortgage Ready”

When someone uses the term “millennials,” most people don’t immediately think of financial stability or homeownership. But according to a new study, more millennials than ever are ready, willing, and able to purchase property in today’s market.

A recent study from Urban Institute, which analyzed data from the 31 largest metropolitan statistical areas, found that 19 million millennials across the US are “mortgage ready,” which is defined as being no older than 40, not already having a mortgage, and having ample credit to qualify for a traditional loan (which includes a credit score of 620 or above and no recent credit issues, like bankruptcy or major delinquencies).

Why haven’t these millennials made a move? The report cites misconceptions about down payments as a major contributing factor for mortgage-ready millennials not making the jump into homeownership. (According to a survey released by Laurel Road earlier this year, 46% of Americans were unfamiliar with alternative lending options, and many millennials aren’t aware they can leverage these alternative lending options to purchase a home with as little as 3% down.)

The Takeaway

If you’re a mortgage-ready millennial but haven’t made a move because you’ve been struggling to save a large down payment, it’s time to start exploring alternative lending options. In today’s market, you don’t need 20% for a down payment—you might already have everything you need to purchase a home.

Moving with kids? This can help

3 Tips to Help Your Kids Cope With A Move

There are more than just logistical challenges when you move with children. Many kids feel emotional about leaving their friends or old home behind. Here are some common challenges kids face when moving and ways to help them feel more comfortable in their new place.

When your child is nervous about a new school …

Coordinate a tour of the school well before she starts so she can get familiar with the building. See if you can also introduce her to teachers and a few classmates so she’ll have connections on her first day.

When your child is upset about leaving friends behind …

Put together treats your child can use to remember his far-away friends. Include a photo album, frames, and other mementos from your child’s hometown.

When your child is worried the new city won’t have familiar activities …

Call us today and we can help you get information that can help you and your family transition during a move!

How to impress buyers

Little Things That Make a Big Impression on Buyers

It doesn’t take much to ruin a buyer’s impression of a home.

Take an otherwise appealing house and add peeling paint, a leaky faucet, and dirty dishes in the sink, and suddenly the buyer crosses that property off his list. Just as minor imperfections can turn off a buyer, a few small actions by you can make your home seem even more appealing.

Fix conspicuous problems

If you can’t afford to remedy all the problems with the house, at least fix obvious ones. A buyer will notice the rotten porch railing or cracked window pane on a casual walk-through.

Show the owner’s manuals

Sure, everything’s available online, but you still need to know the model number of your oven, dishwasher, and microwave when something breaks. Showing buyers that you’ve kept that information suggests that you’ve taken care of other things related to the house.

Make an effort outside

Short grass makes bare patches less obvious, and a few bags of mulch around trees and in flower beds can work magic on an otherwise lackluster yard. Add in a planter of colorful flowers by the front door, and you’ve added significantly to your curb appeal.

A little effort goes a long way with buyers, so ensure your home makes a great first impression.

When Is The Best Time Of Year To Buy A Home?

One question that pops up constantly from both first-time and seasoned homeowners alike is “When is the best time of year to buy a home?” Potential homeowners want to know the best time of year to get the best home for the lowest price – and ideally, at a time that makes sense for their life.

It would be great if there were a simple and straightforward answer, like “the best time of year to purchase a home is between April 1 and April 7.” But unfortunately, it’s not that simple.

Let’s take a look at the factors that play into answering the question “when is the best time of year to buy a home?”

Convenience

The first factor to consider when buying a home is convenience. This is particularly important if you have a family.

If you have school-aged children, you ideally want to move in between school years, so sometime between May and August. Pulling a child out of school in the middle of the year can be challenging, and children might have a hard time to adjusting to a new school in the middle of the year.

However, because so many potential homeowners have families that want to move during this time period, it drives up the prices, making the summer the most expensive time a year to buy a home.

So, if your main concern is convenience for your family, then summer is a good time to buy – just be prepared to pay a higher price than you would at other times of year.

Inventory

If your top priority is having a lot of houses to choose from, you’ll want to buy a house during the time of year when the most homes are on the market. That way, you’ll have your pick of multiple properties and are much more likely to find a home that has all the items on your wish list.

In most areas, the highest inventory peaks in the spring, right before the end of the school year. Inventory stays high throughout the summer and then starts to fall in early autumn, with the lowest inventory happening in late autumn and winter.

If you want a variety of homes to choose from, look to buy in the spring.

Price

If your main goal is to get an amazing home at a low price, the best time of year to buy is when competition is low. When there aren’t as many people looking to buy, it drives down the prices of homes, and you can purchase property at a significantly lower rate. On average, homes cost 8.45% less in January and February than they do in June, July, and August.

If you were looking at purchasing a $500,000 property, that would bring the price down $42,250 for a sale price of $457,750. That kind of price drop could save you a significant amount of money over the course of your mortgage and lower your monthly payments.

If you’re looking to get the most house for your money, purchasing a home in the winter is definitely your best bet.

The best time of year to buy a home is largely dependent on your needs and priorities. If you’re looking to buy at a time that’s most convenient for your family (and in particular, your children), buying during the summer is a great option. If you want to see as many homes as possible in order to find a property that has everything you’re looking for in a home, you’ll want to buy a home in the spring, when inventory is at its highest. And if your bottom line is you want to pay the lowest price possible, purchasing a home in the winter, when prices are significantly lower, will be the most advantageous.

Just keep in mind that finding and purchasing a home takes time; while it happens, the chances of finding a property during the first week of looking for a home are slim. On average, people spend 30 – 60 days looking for a home and another 14 – 60 days from contract to close, so make sure to give yourself plenty of lead time to take advantage of the time of year that’s best for YOU to purchase.